Celebrities

Cate Blanchett: Social Media Is “Not the Judge and Jury” of Woody Allen

As more and more figures in Hollywood speak out about the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements sweeping Hollywood, they are, for the most part, also taking a step away from director Woody Allen, due to the allegations against the director brought forth by Dylan Farrow, Allen’s estranged daughter. For years, Farrow has claimed that Allen sexually abused her when she was a child. (Allen has denied the claims.) Numerous actresses—Greta Gerwig,Rebecca Hall,Ellen Page,Rachel Brosnahan,Kate Winslet—and actors—Colin Firth,Michael Caine,Timothée Chalamet—who collaborated with Allen in the past have publicly spoken out against the director in recent months. But one actress, Allen’s Oscar-winning Blue Jasmine leading lady Cate Blanchett, isn’t quite as ready to step away. In a new interview with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour, Blanchett said that social media—the birthplace of these hashtag social-justice movements—is “not the judge and jury” when it comes to Allen.

In the wake of the Time’s Up movement, Dylan Farrow has been emboldened to share her story more publicly and more often, prompting journalists such as Amanpour to press former- and current-Allen collaborators for their take on the director. Amanpour questioned Blanchett, saying: “How do you juxtapose being a #MeToo proponent, a Time’s Up proponent, and staying silent or having worked with Woody Allen?” She also asked if Blanchett would work with Allen again, given the allegations. The actress responded:

I don’t think I’ve stayed silent at all. At the time that I worked with Woody Allen, I knew nothing of the allegations, and it came out during the time that the film was released. At the time, I said it’s a very painful and complicated situation for the family, which I hope they have the ability to resolve. And if these allegations need to be re-examined which, in my understanding, they’ve been through court, then I’m a big believer in the justice system and setting legal precedents. If the case needs to be reopened, I am absolutely, wholeheartedly in support of that. Because I think that there’s one thing about—social media is fantastic about raising awareness about issues, but it’s not the judge and jury.

Blanchett elaborated that her preference for a more codified condemnation of sexual abusers is derived from concern for future victims. “I feel that these things need to go into court, so if these abuses have happened, the person is prosecuted, and so someone, who is not in the shiny industry that I am, can use that legal precedent to protect themselves,” she explained. “Always, in my industry or any other industry, they’re preyed upon because they’re vulnerable.”

Allen, meanwhile, issued the following statement to CBS This Morning back in January after Farrow re-stated her allegations of abuse:

When this claim was first made more than 25 years ago, it was thoroughly investigated by both the Child Sexual Abuse Clinic of the Yale-New Haven Hospital and New York State Child Welfare. They both did so for many months and independently concluded that no molestation had ever taken place. Instead, they found it likely a vulnerable child had been coached to tell the story by her angry mother during a contentious breakup. Dylan’s older brother Moses has said that he witnessed their mother doing exactly that—relentlessly coaching Dylan, trying to drum into her that her father was a dangerous sexual predator.

Farrow named Blanchett (and a few other actresses) specifically when pointing out what was, in her view, an incongruity between defending Woody Allen while also declaring that “Time’s Up.”

This article has been updated.

Get Vanity Fair’s HWD NewsletterSign up for essential industry and award news from Hollywood.Full ScreenPhotos:See Cate Blanchett’s Style Evolution from Her Very First Oscars

Oscars, 1999

For her first Oscars, and first nomination for best actress for her role as Queen Elizabeth I in Elizabeth, Blanchett wore a gown by John Galliano.Photo: By KMazur/WireImage.Oscars, 2000

Oscars, 2000

For her second time at the awards, she chose a black gown by Jean Paul Gaultier with gold-chain details on her arms and back.Photo: By Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic.Golden Globes, 2003

Golden Globes, 2003

Photo: By Frank Micelotta/Getty Images.Oscars, 2005

Oscars, 2005

Blanchett won her first Oscar, in 2005, in a pale-yellow silk-taffeta confection designed by Valentino.Photo: By Carlo Allegri/Getty Images.Oscars, 2016

Oscars, 2016

She may not have won the Oscar that night, but Blanchett had one of the best looks on the red carpet with her floral-embellished Armani Privé gown.Photo: By Steve Granitz/WireImage.Louis Vuitton exhibition, 2016

Louis Vuitton exhibition, 2016

Perfectly complementing the step-and-repeat, she wore a black, white, grey, and yellow Louis Vuitton dress to celebrate an exhibition in honor of the designer.Photo: By Masatoshi Okauchi/REX/Shutterstock.Louis Vuitton x Jeff Koons exhibition, 2017

Louis Vuitton x Jeff Koons exhibition, 2017

She opted for all black at the brand’s next exhibition, a collaboration with artist Jeff Koons.Photo: By YOAN VALAT/EPA/REX/Shutterstock.PreviousNext

Oscars, 1999

Oscars, 1999

For her first Oscars, and first nomination for best actress for her role as Queen Elizabeth I in Elizabeth, Blanchett wore a gown by John Galliano.By KMazur/WireImage.

Oscars, 2000

Oscars, 2000

For her second time at the awards, she chose a black gown by Jean Paul Gaultier with gold-chain details on her arms and back.By Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic.

Golden Globes, 2003

Golden Globes, 2003

By Frank Micelotta/Getty Images.

Oscars, 2005

Oscars, 2005

Blanchett won her first Oscar, in 2005, in a pale-yellow silk-taffeta confection designed by Valentino.By Carlo Allegri/Getty Images.

SAG Awards, 2005

SAG Awards, 2005

She looked statuesque in a minimalist black gown at the 2005 SAG Awards. “I wore a really tight dress that’s very ungracious walking up those stairs,” she said as she accepted the best-supporting-actress award.By Vince Bucci/Getty Images.

Cannes, 2006

Cannes, 2006

For the Cannes premiere of Babel, she wore a kimono-style gown by Alexander McQueen.By George Pimentel/WireImage.

Premiere Women in Hollywood, 2006

Premiere Women in Hollywood, 2006

She wore a short, silk dress with a tan ruffled collar for the 13th Annual Premiere Women in Hollywood.By Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic.

Golden Globes, 2007

Golden Globes, 2007

A longtime fan of Alexander McQueen, Blanchett turned to the British fashion house to outfit her for the 2007 Golden Globes. “When I have my moments of insomnia, you’ll find me on style.com,” she once said. And it shows.By Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

Met Gala, 2007

Met Gala, 2007

At the 2007 Met Gala, the theme honored glamorous French couturier Paul Poiret, and she chose a glittering Balenciaga gown for the occasion.By Evan Agostini/Getty Images.

Oscars, 2008

Oscars, 2008

Blanchett walked the Oscars red carpet while six months pregnant with her third child, Ignatius Martin, wearing a Dries Van Noten gown.By Steve Granitz/WireImage.

Receiving her star, 2008

Receiving her star, 2008

Wearing wide-legged trousers and a pin-stripped blazer to receive her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.By Gregg DeGuire/WireImage.

<em>Vogue</em> Australia Anniversary Party, 2009

Vogue Australia Anniversary Party, 2009

She celebrated Vogue Australia’s 50th anniversary in a loose, red Ossie Clark gown with matching red heels.By Gaye Gerard/Getty Images.

Cannes, 2010

Cannes, 2010

One of her most polarizing looks to date, the Alexander McQueen gown Cate wore to the Robin Hood Cannes Film Festival premiere was personally selected by the late designer himself.By Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images.

Tony Awards, 2010

Tony Awards, 2010

Blanchett ditched the dress and opted for a metallic silver Giorgio Armani Privé suit for the Tony Awards.By Dave Allocca/StarPix/REX/Shutterstock.

Oscars, 2011

Oscars, 2011

Her Givenchy Couture gown was beaded with lilac and yellow details that crossed over the back. She told InStyle, “The color combination, I couldn’t believe it when I saw it in real life.”By ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images.

Met Gala, 2012

Met Gala, 2012

For the superhero-themed Met Gala, Blachett wore an ostrich-feathered Alexander McQueen gown with an elaborate display of plumage cascading down the hemline.By Larry Busacca/Getty Images.

<em>Blue Jasmine</em> Premiere, 2013

Blue Jasmine Premiere, 2013

Blanchett was ahead of the curve in 2013, wearing a “millennial pink” look by Balenciaga Edition.By Dimitrios Kambouris/WireImage.

New York Film Critics Awards, 2014

New York Film Critics Awards, 2014

Cate Blanchett thrilled fashion critics in the sculptural Antonio Berardi dress, with bold red lining, she wore to the 2014 New York Film Critics Awards.By Cindy Ord/Getty Images.

Oscars, 2014

Oscars, 2014

In 2014, the Australian actress wore one of the most expensive Oscars gowns of all time: an Armani Privé dress embellished with $100,000 worth of Swarovski crystals.By Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

Cannes, 2015

Cannes, 2015

A billowing Giles gown was the perfect choice for the Carol premiere at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival.By Clemens Bilan/Getty Images.

Golden Globes, 2016

Golden Globes, 2016

Cementing her status as a fashion icon, Blanchett wore a blush-pink Givenchy number with dazzling embroidery and fringe detail.By Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

Oscars, 2016

Oscars, 2016

She may not have won the Oscar that night, but Blanchett had one of the best looks on the red carpet with her floral-embellished Armani Privé gown.By Steve Granitz/WireImage.

Louis Vuitton exhibition, 2016

Louis Vuitton exhibition, 2016

Perfectly complementing the step-and-repeat, she wore a black, white, grey, and yellow Louis Vuitton dress to celebrate an exhibition in honor of the designer.By Masatoshi Okauchi/REX/Shutterstock.

Louis Vuitton x Jeff Koons exhibition, 2017

Louis Vuitton x Jeff Koons exhibition, 2017

She opted for all black at the brand’s next exhibition, a collaboration with artist Jeff Koons.By YOAN VALAT/EPA/REX/Shutterstock.

Joanna RobinsonJoanna Robinson is a Hollywood writer covering TV and film for VanityFair.com.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *